Emily Pilloton: Teaching design for change

15 04 2011

http://www.ted.com Designer Emily Pilloton moved to rural Bertie County, in North Carolina, to engage in a bold experiment of design-led community transformation. She’s teaching a design-build class called Studio H that engages high schoolers’ minds and bodies while bringing smart design and new opportunities to the poorest county in the state.TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the “Sixth Sense” wearable tech, and “Lost” producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at http://www.ted.com
Video Rating: 4 / 5


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25 responses

15 04 2011
marjoriedebbieful

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15 04 2011
Aresftfun

@theprofits13 It’s a pet peeve.

15 04 2011
theprofits13

@Aresftfun So how should she describe them? and out of the whole talk this is the important part you noticed? smh.

15 04 2011
AlcoholLevel

kids learning multiplication in a playground filled with worn-out tires… I’m sure they’ll be competing on the international stage one day……………………………..

15 04 2011
erickdircks

What a way of meeting people and get to see their talent. At first was reluctant being on youtube, but getting to do this has brought me into the houses of some very special people. You are one of them. Life; isn’t it wonderful!!! Keep up the good work. and have a Happy New Year!!!!
A New Friend
Erick

15 04 2011
leonidasx666

I liked this a lot. Almost made me wanna go back to school… almost 😛

15 04 2011
mmballa

@Aresftfun Black or African American are both vastly accepted terms and are not considered offensive by 99% of the population. Terms such as Colored and Negro were once accepted too, and are now considered offensive by most black people. Yes the naacp and uncf still use these outdated terms, but that’s just a reflection of the age of these organizations. Finally, feel free to use the term Black or African American, just don’t try to limit others from using what they’re comfortable with

15 04 2011
Aresftfun

@mmballa And averagely the default usage in speaking is to call them “African American” in courts and news and other formal areas, while most of the Black population prefers to be called black or just that no one is labeled by their skin color.

15 04 2011
mmballa

@Aresftfun again “some people PREFER this usage”…..if that’s their preference then who are you to question it?…..Also, because slavery predated colonialism, people African decent don’t have countries of origin to call home….but they do have a connection to the African continent.

15 04 2011
Aresftfun

@mmballa And what about the side of white heritage? Should they not be called European-African-American?
Or Anglo-African-American?
Is it unneeded for there to be a European show of respect because Africa needs it? What is the requirement for having a continent in your label?

15 04 2011
mmballa

@Aresftfun (Like “Japanese American,” or “German American” The term is meant to recognize the African ancestry of all Americans with African heritage, whether they immigrated from Ghana last week or are descended from slaves brought to America in the 1500s. Some people prefer this usage because it includes a nod of respect to their ethnic heritage.”)

15 04 2011
SkyFallingInc

A very eloquent young lady, and well-composed talk.

15 04 2011
Mrmoc7

It’s ideas like these that are going to solve the educational problem in the U.S., and once again we’re going to set the standard for the rest of the world to follow.

You go girl.

15 04 2011
BastiSexMuffin

@kwkwave And yet there are privileged black kids and disadvantaged white kids. Generalization is the basis for racism and she did just that.

15 04 2011
kwkwave

@BastiSexMuffin Because the privileged kids in this particular county are predominantly white.

15 04 2011
sukanasturtle

wow, if you just look past the race comments she made (which i know she had no bad intentions of), this talk is amazing

15 04 2011
Kargoneth

I must say, it is a good idea to have people help build their community. I still have pride in helping to construct my neighbor’s garage for my high-school shop class.

15 04 2011
BastiSexMuffin

“Privileged white kids”. Good job, lady! Why not just “privileged kids”?

15 04 2011
TheDentist27

@SayChickpeas that’s a separate issue, tutoring. I’m not against that. I am against a teacher standing infront of the room for an hour talking to him or herself. I went through many, many, years of it.

15 04 2011
SayChickpeas

@TheDentist27 The value of being engaged in learning vastly dwarfs the value of any money paid for achievement. Lectures are not an engaging learning style for young people, recorded lectures even less so. Hands-on involvement and practical applications of principals nurture the playful spirit which young people thrive upon. That cannot be replaced by a check. This TED talk is a great example of how to help youth be invested in their own achievements by adding value to their communities.

15 04 2011
Aresftfun

@andresico2 I completely agree.

15 04 2011
andresico2

@Aresftfun there’s still a need for people to distinguish others based not only on physical traits but also on color. Since some people think Black isn’t p.c, then they use African American, even when the person isn’t of African descent.

I think it’s pathetic that we still find the need to distinguish between humans, and I don’t think there’s a problem describing someone as “black”, or as “red-headed” because those physically describe a person. African-american doesn’t help me much.

15 04 2011
jestempies

@Aresftfun African-American is a name, not a description.

15 04 2011
PoopnSuch

@Aresftfun she should have just called em all niggas

15 04 2011
bleekhorizon

@Aresftfun all she did was pick a phrase she felt was unoffensive. comments like this only distract people from the message of the lecture.




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